Ready to sell?

Why Use A REALTOR

Selling a home?
It pays to work with a REALTOR® and we at Slate Real Estate are here to provide our expertise at selling your home. Only a real estate professional who belongs to the National Association of REALTORS® may call himself or herself a REALTOR®. A REALTOR® is bound by a strict Code of Ethics and is required to provide fair treatment to all parties involved in the transaction.

Here are some ways we can help you sell your home.

  • A REALTOR® knows the market and gives your property maximum exposure through the NTREIS Multiple Listing Service.
  • A REALTOR® qualifies prospective buyers as to what they can afford.
  • A REALTOR® understands current real estate values and can help you set a realistic, competitive price for your home.
  • A REALTOR® is familiar with the local mortgage market and can help you decide if seller-financing might expedite your sale.
  • A REALTOR® calculates the net proceeds you can expect from the sale of your home, taking into account your outstanding loan balance, closing costs and possible owner financing.
  • A REALTOR® frees you from the problems associated with showing your home such as phone inquiries, showings, and negotiation of the contract.
  • A REALTOR® maintains objectivity in presenting offers and counter-offers.
  • A REALTOR® prepares you for closing procedures.

If you’re planning to sell your home, it’s probably crossed your mind to try to sell it yourself and save the sales commission. But, there are some very good reasons why that would be a mistake. According to housing industry experts at HomeGain.com and Realtor.org, more homes listed by real estate agents are sold than homes marketed by owners, and they sell more quickly and for more money. Homes listed by real estate professionals get more exposure and their sellers get more support. Real estate professionals offer many advantages:

  • They’re trained and licensed professionals.
  • They have experience in your neighborhood and your market.
  • They have oversight from brokers and state licensing officials.
  • Their job is to advise you the best way to reach your goals.
  • Their continuing education keeps them up-to-date on housing issues.
  • They know how to present your home and deal with buyers.
  • They know how and where to market properties.
  • They know how to overcome typical snags that occur in all real estate transactions and closings.
  • They understand state-required disclosures and look out for your best interests.
  • They understand personal safety and security for your belongings during showings.
  • They know the best resources to make transactions go more smoothly, from bankers to homestagers to contractors.
  • They have the most accurate data sources – the MLS, the only data repository that has the most up-to-date listing and sales information.
  • They know how to negotiate.
  • Their job is making real estate transactions successful. When you market your own home, you have to make the time to do all the jobs a real estate professional would do, and you’ll be competing against other sellers who have real estate professionals by their sides. If you can’t leave work to show your home, or you feel it requires more knowledge and experience than you have, you can’t go wrong by hiring a well-respected real estate professional.

Steps to a Positive Showing

This page describes the key steps for a positive showing of your property. You only get one opportunity to make a good impression, so you want to make it count. By following these guidelines, you’ll enhance the attractiveness of your property and reduce the time it takes to generate serious offers.

First Impressions

How your property appears from the outside is important. To make a good first impression on a buyer, a clean driveway, a freshly mown lawn or a trimmed hedge will work wonders. Do a critical inspection of the exterior of your property, paying special attention to the condition of your windows, shutters, screens and gutters. One of the first things a buyer will notice is the need for painting. If your property looks like it needs painting, many buyers will form an unfavorable impression. Elsewhere, little things count. Make sure the front door is spotless, including the doorknob, and that the windows gleam.

Cleanliness Counts

Once inside your property, one of the key factors that influence its appeal to a buyer is cleanliness. Most important is the front hallway, the kitchen, and the bathrooms. Do a room-by-room cleaning, and don’t forget any out-of-sight areas because that’s often where a discriminating buyer will look first. The state of the carpets can also be a determining factor. At the very least, have your carpets cleaned, and if they are worn, it’s wise to replace them, or remove them if there is hardwood underneath.

Less is More

Clutter makes a poor impression. In closets, cabinets, kitchen countertops and other storage areas like basements, remove anything not needed for daily housekeeping. To make each room in your property look larger, get rid of or donate unnecessary furniture. Walk through your property and think: “Less is more.”

Repairs

Make sure everything is in good working order. Dripping faucets, squeaky steps, and loose doorknobs can easily create a bad impression and reduce the value of your property. A few hours spent on repairs, whether by yourself or a tradesman, can pay big dividends when an offer is made. Little Things Count It’s easy to improve the appearance of any room. You may want to replace worn rugs or small pillows, put new towels in the bathroom or brighten up a room with a vase of flowers.

Pull Together

Get all the members of your household to pull together when it comes to getting – and keeping – your property ready to view. By getting everyone into the habit of spending a few minutes tidying up every morning for an afternoon showing, you improve your chances considerably.

WHAT’S YOUR HOME WORTH?

In a neighborhood of similar homes, why is one worth more than another?

That’s the question that’s teased buyers and sellers for ages, but the answer is simple. Every home is different. When a home is sold, a willing seller and a willing buyer have just announced to the world the value of that home. From there, other similar homes are benchmarked, but other factors come into play. The most important are:

Location - The closer a home is to jobs, parks, transportation, schools, and community services, the more desirable it is.

Size - Square footage impacts home values because they’re built using more materials.

Larger lot sizes mean more privacy.

Number of bedrooms and baths - Over time, median homes have grown larger. Decades ago, household members shared bedrooms and baths without complaint, but today, families want more privacy. The median home purchased today is a three-bedroom, two-bath home.

Features and finishes - Features such as outdoor kitchens and spa baths make a home more luxurious. A home finished with hardwood floors and granite countertops is going to cost more than a home with carpet and laminate countertops.

Condition - The closer a home is to new construction, the more it will retain its value. It’s perceived as more modern, up to date, and perhaps safer. Homes that are not updated or in poor repair sell for less. It’s a good idea for homeowners to keep their homes updated and in top repair.

Curb appeal - From the street, the home looks clean, fresh, and inviting. Fresh landscaping and flowers won’t change the size or location, but they certainly add charm. When two homes are identical in the same neighborhood, a higher price may come down to something as simple as views, or paint colors, or the overall taste of the homeowner.

Valuing a home will never be an exact science, but if you buy wisely, keep your home updated and in good repair, you should recoup most if not all of your investment.

Call us at (817) 220-2700 or email Lisa Burkhalter at lisa@slaterealestate.com for a free Comparative Market Analysis of your home.